Bendor Grosvenor

Consultant

Bendor Grosvenor

Bendor Grosvenor studied English history at Pembroke College, Cambridge, and the University of East Anglia. He joined Philip Mould Ltd in 2005, and oversees the gallery's research, cataloguing and acquisitions. He is a member of the Lord Chancellor's Advisory Council on National Records and Archives, and the Lord Chancellor's Forum for Historical Manuscripts and Academic Research.


Bendor has made several important discoveries of lost works by artists such as Thomas Gainsborough, Sir Thomas Lawrence and Sir Anthony Van Dyck, on whom he is an acknowledged expert. In 2008 he re-identified the Scottish National Portrait Gallery’s iconic pastel by La Tour of ‘Bonnie Prince Charlie’ as a portrait of Charles’ younger brother, Prince Henry Stuart. In 2009 he showed that the sixteenth century artist referred to as ‘the famous painter Steven’ was not Steven van der Meulen, as suggested by art historians since the early 20th Century, but Steven van Herwijck.


He regularly publishes books and articles on history, art history and current affairs. His PhD was on British foreign policy during Benjamin Disraeli's second government, from 1874-8. His most recent publication is a volume of edited documents on foreign policy in the 19th Century for the Royal Historical Society, published by Cambridge University Press. He co-wrote 'Crap MPs - The 40 Worst MPs in History', a Christmas book published by Harper Collins in 2009. Other subjects include the relationship between Queen Victoria and her servant John Brown, and, following his work with Dr David Starkey for the ‘Lost Faces’ exhibition at Philip Mould, possible new identities for three Tudor Queens.


Before working for Philip Mould, Bendor worked in politics, as an adviser to the Conservatives on culture policy. He was a member of the Arts Taskforce set up by David Cameron, under the Chairmanship of Sir John Tusa. He helped establish the All Party History Group in the Houses of Parliament. He does the research for and appears in the BBC1 television series on lost works of art, ‘Fake or Fortune?’, and is currently working on the third series. He also presents programmes for BBC2’s The Culture Show.
 

Bendor's website is; www.arthistorynews.com